Exploring California's Tectonic History

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Exploring California's Tectonic History

320.00

Exploring California's Tectonic History July 9 - 14, 2018

Age: 4th grade and above. Meet @ Santa Rosa Park, San Luis Obispo

Registration fees cover all costs associated with the week's activities, including meals at Pinnacles campout.

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Exploring California's Tectonic History July 09-14, 2018

Monday - -Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm.  Meet at Santa Rosa Park in San Luis Obispo

Ages 4th grade and above

Day 1:   Montana de Oro State Park is the only location on the California coast south of Monterey, where Shale formations can be seen up-close. This sedimentary rock, composed of silt, sand and the exoskeletons of diatoms, forms the wave cut marine terraces along the shores of the park. Shale forms the reefs around Hazard's Canyon, and the Coves along the bluff trails; a testament to their underwater origins, 

Day 2:     Carrizo Plain displays unique geological examples of tectonic activity along the San Andreas Fault, and is also home the amazing Soda Lake. 

Day 3 and 4:  Pinnacles National Park in the chaparral-covered Gabilan Mountains, east of central California's Salinas Valley, are the spectacular remains of an ancient volcanic field.  Millions of years of erosion, faulting and tectonic plate movement defined this volcanic formation which provides habitat to hundreds of native plant species (not including epiphytes, like lichen). There are 18 different species of trees and more than 50 species of shrubs. Wildflowers are pollinated by the park's 400 species of bees, a higher density of species per area than any other known place in the world. Five natural plant communities exist within the park, with its highly varied topography, soil types, and solar orientation.  Because of its’ long-term protected status, Pinnacles maintains a relatively high proportion of native plants compared to areas outside the park. In fact, chaparral vegetation at Pinnacles is a showcase example of ecosystems that existed up and down coastal California, prior to urban development and agricultural alteration. We'll explore Bear Gulch Caves and Reservoir on the first day, and camp overnight on the East Side, of the park. We'll explore the Balconies Caves and the Chaparral on the West side of the park on Day 2.  On the way home, we'll visit Mission San Antonio, near Jolon. It is a place of historical significance and houses examples of Salinin native culture.

Day 5:We'll kayak to the Sandspit Dunes and explore the dune formations and the Estero Coast line.  We'll examine the ways that wind and waves continually reshape the dune systems. We'll finish off the week with an afternoon trolley ride and lunch on the Embarcadero